What Can We Learn From the “One-Percent”?

Instead of deriding the one percent as being out of touch with the rest of us, maybe we can learn something from them–like how to improve our children’s educational success. Dr. Sean Reardon, a Stanford professor of education and sociology, believes that high-income parents are enriching their children’s educational opportunities, from the day they are […]

Charter Schools vs. Public Schools: Comparing Apples and Oranges

This is not another article bashing charter schools — far from it. They continue to thrive not only because of widespread dissatisfaction with public schools, but more importantly because they have duplicated the quintessential culture of education that I have advocated for (i.e., that student learning and subsequent success are possible when surrounded by support and […]

Parenting TV

With the spotlight starting to shift toward parent accountability in education, I have been asked to detail concrete ideas that would help establish good parenting foundations. Like some educators, I have broadly advocated for a parenting education program that begins as soon as the mother is pregnant. Specifically, a universal opt-out program, meaning that any […]

Toward a Holistic Approach to Education

Despite continued pessimism about the state of American public education, there is reason for hope. Why? Within the past year or so, there appears to be a small but noticeable shift in public discourse towards exploring non-school factors in reform. Generally, the past three decades have brought on a “no excuses” accountability movement, epitomized by […]

Tunnel Vision Reform

Education researcher Esther Quintero lucidly dissected the inherently illogical foundations of current reform efforts in the Shanker Blog, entitled The Un-American Foundations of Our Education Debate. Her perspective mirrored my own about the misplaced emphasis on teacher accountability without a concurrent one on student and family accountability (see my article, Conservatives: What Happened to Personal Responsibility?). […]

Merit Pay: The Issues People Ignore

I wanted to share my response to journalist Nicholas Kristof in his The New York Times article, Paying Teachers More, which also advocated tying teacher salaries to student performance (i.e., merit pay). Minor adjustments were made below from my original submitted comment: Your views tends to be typical of those that do not appear to […]

Asians on Education: What Poverty?

All this talk in education about poverty being the major reason for poor academic achievement and performance got me thinking: Is it really just poverty? No doubt it plays an important role. Researchers Hart & Risley’s well-cited longitudinal study in the early 1990s found that children in welfare families were exposed to substantially less language at […]

Tracing the Roots of our Malaise

With a spirited public discussion on education reform by politicians, educators, and the media reaching critical mass, it is somewhat comforting to witness such a concerted effort to solve America’s education problems. Such extensive attention to reform leads to a thought-provoking question: Why are we in this mess?