What Can We Learn From the “One-Percent”?

Instead of deriding the one percent as being out of touch with the rest of us, maybe we can learn something from them–like how to improve our children’s educational success. Dr. Sean Reardon, a Stanford professor of education and sociology, believes that high-income parents are enriching their children’s educational opportunities, from the day they are […]

The Impact of Demographics on 21st Century Education

This article was originally published in Society (May/June 2013, Vol. 50, Issue 3). The final publication is available at link.springer.com The National Academy of Sciences’ (2007) report, Rising Above the Gathering Storm, called for more scientific and technical innovation to maintain America’s economic growth and vitality. Countless other reports over the past few decades have all […]

Book Review. The New Political Economy of Urban Education: Neoliberalism, Race, and the Right to the City.

  This article was originally published in Education and Urban Society (Jan. 2013, Vol 45, Number 1, pp. 163-165).  Who owns public goods? Conventional wisdom supposes that tax-paying citizens do, via the stewardship of elected officials. Education, housing, and transportation all fall into this category and are thus considered nonexcludable (no one can be effectively […]

A Divided Public: 2012 PDK Poll on Public Education

Uncertainty and disagreement characterized a large portion of the general public’s attitudes toward education issues, according to the recent 2012 Phi Delta Kappan’s annual Gallup poll. Among the major highlights, the public is divided about whether: Teachers should be evaluated based on student standardized test scores (52% favor; 47% opposed) Parents should receive vouchers to […]

The Most Valid and Reliable Teacher Assessment (Hint: It’s Not VA)

What’s the point of performance-based teacher evaluations? A few years ago, one of my former graduate professors casually suggested, “Let the children grade the teachers. It’s just as reliable as any out there now if not more.” Intellectually, it made no sense: students, especially young ones, can’t possibly know what makes an effective teacher. Their […]

The Long-term Impact of Early Childhood Education on Student Outcomes

Does going to a high-quality early education program help young disadvantaged children do significantly better at the age of 28? That is the question Reynolds, Temple, Ou, Arteaga, & White sought to answer in their comprehensive 2011 study of the Child Parent Center (CPC), an early childhood-based intervention program in the heart of Chicago’s high […]

The One Thing Successful People Have Isn’t Taught in Schools

Success can be defined in many ways and can be seen in people as diverse as Steve Jobs, Jay-Z, Gandhi, or Lance Armstrong. They all have different skills that range from the entrepreneurial to the athletic, but one trait they have in common is the one thing that schools neglect to teach. A certain character […]

Parenting TV

With the spotlight starting to shift toward parent accountability in education, I have been asked to detail concrete ideas that would help establish good parenting foundations. Like some educators, I have broadly advocated for a parenting education program that begins as soon as the mother is pregnant. Specifically, a universal opt-out program, meaning that any […]

Legislating Parenting is Still Missing the Point

Recently, two articles (one by The New York Times and the other by Psychology Today) have brought to light the movement toward parent accountability – the notion that parents should to be liable (even punished) if students are chronically absent or if they rarely complete homework, for example. Alaska already fines parents for child truancy. […]

Toward a Holistic Approach to Education

Despite continued pessimism about the state of American public education, there is reason for hope. Why? Within the past year or so, there appears to be a small but noticeable shift in public discourse towards exploring non-school factors in reform. Generally, the past three decades have brought on a “no excuses” accountability movement, epitomized by […]